All Day and A Night ~ Alafair Burke

Screen-Shot-2014-09-17-at-2.42.32-pmHave you had your flu’ jab yet this winter?  Those of you who know about these things will be aware that it is a different concoction every winter and apparently I am not alone in finding this year’s mix more potent than usual.  It is taking quite a lot of people out for a couple of days.  Consequently, I am very glad to be able to tell you that Issue 3 of Shiny New Books is out and to be able to do just a short post to point you in the direction of my review there of Alafair Burke’s latest Ellie Hatcher novel, All Day and a Night.

I reviewed the first in this series, Dead Connection, some time ago and made the point then that Burke’s work is hardly great literature, but even that book was a rattling good read and this, the NYPD detective’s fifth outing, is considerably better.  Like all good crime fiction, the novel is concerned with a specific situation that is indicative of a current societal issue, in this case, the question of the mistrust between the police and the public they serve, and Burke offers no easy answers to a problem that is as relevant on this side of the Atlantic as it is in America.

If you haven’t yet discovered Burke’s New York novels then you have many happy hours of reading in front of you.  She has certainly gone onto my list of authors whose new books I am looking to read the moment that they become available.

The Severed Streets ~ Paul Cornell

SeveredStreets.jpg.size-230-188x300In the dog days at the end of last year I stumbled across London Falling the first of Paul Cornell’s novels about DI James Quinn and the other members of his team of London police personnel involved in investigating a series of events that no self-respecting DI would really want to admit were happening.  Cornell, a scriptwriter from Doctor Who, had taken the supernatural elements from his televisual existence and blended them with the well loved formula of the police procedural and come up with a hybrid that is perhaps only comparable with the Peter Grant series by Ben Aaronovitch.  That first outing for DI Quinn and his colleagues had its scary moments but it also had a light touch that had me laughing as often as holding my breath.  Now, in The Severed Streets, the second book in the sequence, Cornell turns his attention to much more serious affairs and compels us to look deeper into the forces at work behind those financial and governmental institutions that control our lives whether we like it or not.  You can read my review of this excellent second novel in the latest edition of Shiny New Books by following the link below.

http://shinynewbooks.co.uk/fiction02/the-severed-streets-by-paul-cornell/